LINE UP

2013 Out/Loud Lineup!:

12:30 pm to 6:00 pm:

Queer Youth Slam Poetry Project Presents Anthony Craig

Bekah the Baloon Animal Maker

Magic with Tyler Twombly

Spin Cycle Squares

Zumba!

Better Than

Csea Sky

Ryan Riddick

Siche Green-Mitchell

Virginia Cohen

Dalice Malice

Facing Equality film screening

6:00 pm- 10:00 pm

6:15 pm Stacey Ann Chin

7:00 pm Tender Forever

7:35 pm Taina Asili y La Bande Rebelde

8:15 pm Thee Satisfaction

9:15 pm Girl in a Coma


Check out what they sound like!:

Girl in a Coma
Thee Satisfaction
Tender Forever
Taina Asili y La Bande Rebelde
Dalice Malice

 

Out/Loud Lineup: Artist Bio’s

Who, what, where, when, quick Out/loud info and artist pictures.

Girl in a Coma

Headliner

San Antonio’s Girl In a Coma have left a permanent tattoo on the hearts of thousands with their piercing songs and nuclear performances. They’ve blazed a singular trail since Nina Diaz joined the band at age 13 and have found champions and comrades along the way including Joan Jett who signed them, Morrissey, Sia, Tegan and Sara, The Pogues, and Amanda Palmer who have hand selected them for tours. In addition, Robert Rodriguez asked them to compose one of the key songs for his film Machete last year.  All the while, they have been building one of the most impassioned and diverse fan bases in music. Girl in a Coma are that rare feral band, unaffected by trends, that has managed to stay wild and thrill us at every turn. Exits & All the Rest, their 4th album out November 1, 2011 on Blackheart Records, is the most heart-stopping turn yet.

Girl in a Coma formed when best friends Jenn Alva and Phanie Diaz met in Jr. high school art class over a mutual love of the Smiths, Nirvana, and skipping school. All they needed was a singer. Enter Nina Diaz, Phanie’s little sister. Nina blew them away with her mesmerizing vocals, a powerful voice some critics have compared to Bjork, Patsy Cline, and the band’s hero, Morrissey himself. The trio practiced for three years, gigged at local punk rock clubs, played a High School talent show, one kid’s birthday party, and then hit the road, building up a solid and loyal fan base across the country.

In 2006, the Girls played for Joan Jett and long-time songwriting partner and producer, Kenny Laguna. Jett and Laguna were so impressed with the band that they signed GIAC to their label, Blackheart Records, on the spot.

The band’s 2007 debut album, Both Before I’m Gone, was a critical hit with the album reaching No. 23 on Billboard’s Heatseekers chart and No. 21 on iTunes. “Clumsy Sky,” the band’s first single, won a 2007 Independent Music Award.

In 2009, the band released their follow up album, Trio B.C. Just a year later, the band recorded a companion piece to Trio B.C. Produced by Grammy-award winning producer Greg Collins (U2 and Gwen Stefani), Adventures in Coverland. features reinterpretations of songs and artists who have impacted the band. In early 2011, new material was piling up and the band was ready to head back into the studio to work on their upcoming album, Exits & All the Rest.

From sharing stages with their heroes to experiencing Arizona’s controversial laws firsthand, the album was born in an especially intense period for the band. The Girls headed a few miles north to Austin and recorded with producer Mike McCarthy (Spoon, Trail of Dead). It was the band’s first time working on analog tape and all the basic tracks were laid down live. The recording process seemed to help the band capture some of the raw energy and power that they are known for in their live shows.

The stamp San Antonio’s music scene has left on the band is all over the album and it’s stabs of punk, tejano, rockabilly, classic rock and roll, rancheras, indie rock and ballads all contributing to a sound that can only be described as Girl in a Coma.

THEESatisfaction

“THEESatisfaction are Stasia Irons and Catherine Harris-White. Stas was born and raised in Tacoma, Cat in Seattle and Hawaii. The pair live / laugh / love / dance and create in Seattle, WA. They write, produce and perform their own material, funk-psychedelic feminista sci-fi epics with the warmth and depth of Black Jazz and Sunday morning soul, frosted with icy raps that evoke equal parts Elaine Brown, Ursula Rucker and Q-Tip. They met by what was clearly cosmic happenstance at the University of Washington and haven’t stopped the flow since.

There’s an album by ’70s Blue Note flautist Bobbi Humphrey that’s suggestive of THEESatisfaction. The cover is black and white, Humphrey’s afro full and wide; next to her radiant smile a description is inscribed, a paraphrase of which might read:

THEESatisfaction. Where are they coming from? Where are they going to? If we’re straight on our priorities, you’ll be listening to their album while I tell you about some of the answers …

First principle: they’re positive energy. Black energy, black women leaping oceans and continents at a single bound. With positive strength of purpose.

Further, they’re black purity. Hear that in their intonation. Without trickery. They know the gimmicks, scorn to use ’em. Rather, they’ll face you and relate what’s in their hearts, faithfully and incorruptibly.

Immediately embraced for their singular sound, unflinching commentary, and immortal groove, Stas and Cat made friends, fans and family from coast to coast via their own immaculate grind; a combo of sharp digital hustle and self-booked, self-financed tours that connected them to like minds everywhere. Even crowds with nary a right foot between them find the steps when indoctrinated with THEESat’s unorthodox but right-on-time rhythms. Synchronized, sinewy and sensuous, the regal Stas and Cat channel the higher, whipping like waves of space-borne radiation onstage, leaving a trail of glowing observers abuzz like Geiger counters.

Like their comrades Shabazz Palaces (you may have heard these two on last year’s move Black Up), THEESatisfaction came upon the scene with lovingly handmade CDs of their self-released albums, the first of which was 2008’s That’s Weird. All has been in preparation for the album they’ve envisioned for years, their debut full-length on Sub Pop Records, awE NaturalE.

THEESatisfaction, the Queens Supreme. Bring yourself.”

Staceyann Chin

“Staceyann Chin (born December 25, 1972) is a spoken word poetperforming artist and LGBT rights political activist. Her work has been published in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Pittsburgh Daily, and has been featured on 60 Minutes. She was also featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show, where she shared her struggles growing up homosexual in Jamaica.

Chin was born in Jamaica but now lives in New York City, in Brooklyn. She is of Chinese-Jamaican and Afro-Jamaican descent. She announced in 2011 that she was pregnant with her first child, giving birth to a daughter in January 2012. She has been candid about her pregnancy by means of in-vitro fertilization, and wrote about her experiences as a pregnant, single lesbian in a guest blog for the Huffington Post.

She has been an “out poet and political activist” since 1998. In addition to performing in and co-writing the Tony-nominated Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jamon Broadway, Chin has appeared in Off-Broadway one-woman shows and at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe. She has also held poetry workshops worldwide. Chin credits her accomplishments to her hard-working grandmother and the pain of her mother’s absence.

Chin’s poetry can be found in her first chapbook, Wildcat Woman, the one she now carries on her back, Stories Surrounding My Coming, and numerous anthologies, including Skyscrapers, Taxis and Tampons, Poetry Slam, Role Call, Cultural Studies: Critical Methodologies. Chin’s voice can be heard on CD compilations out of Bar 13- Union Square and Pow Wow productions. In 2009, Chin published her autobiographical novel, The Other Side of Paradise: A Memoir.

She is a host on Logo’s After Ellen Internet show, “She Said What?” and a co-host of Centric‘s My Two Cents. In 2009, Chin performed in The People Speak, a documentary feature film that uses dramatic and musical performances of the letters, diaries, and speeches of everyday Americans, based on historian Howard Zinn‘s A People’s History of the United States.

Chin’s “activist driven” work has garnered praise in various publications. Of her one-woman show Border/Clash, The New York Times wrote that Chin “is sassy, rageful and sometimes softly self-mocking.” The Advocate wrote, “With poems that combine hilarious one-liners with a refusal to conform, Chin is out to confront more than just the straight world.” And in the book, Words in Your Face: A Guided Tour Through Twenty Years of the New York City Poetry Slam, author Cristin O’Keefe Aptowicz referred to Chin as “definitely the prize to win” among the three New York City Poetry Slam venues during the years she competed, adding:

To watch Chin perform is to watch the very essence of poetry manifested: her performances are imperfect, volatile and beautiful. Chin’s poetry is passionate and well-written, sure; but it’s her ability to communicate that passion in performance that is unparalleled. She becomes the poetry.”

Tender Forever

“Tender Forever comes along in tough times. Nobody can ignore the dark places we’ve watched the world go in the past few years. But as divisions grows in the world, so does our ability to connect. Ours is a world exploding with communication and Tender Forever sits neatly in the center of that explosion. Lots of flights and some missed phone calls, friends here, lovers there. Missed connections and connections made. Melanie Valera’s Franco-American pop project spans nationalities and leaps forward towards a world where we can close the gaps between countries, ideologies and ultimately hearts. Move closer.

Tender Forever became Melanie’s project in 2003, a solo effort which simplified and concentrated her music. A laptop, a long mic cord and almost too much enthusiasm was all it took. Tender Forever from the start was as much an experience as a band. That girl with the mic moves with passion, pounds out fear, falls to her knees, cranks up the visuals and passes it off to you. All of this quickly led her out of Bordeaux to the gentle state of Washington and that weird, weird city of Olympia. New friends and collaborators of a like mind kept it a busy summer. These new connections would be the beginning of a Northwest/Bordeaux connection sending bands back and forth, and further establishing Melanie’s new intercontinental artistic life.        The Soft and the Hardcore, released by K in 2005 was the culmination of everything Melanie had done up to this point and then some. Songs sung in the tiny moments of waiting, hoping and loving that we experience daily, fleshed out in full color and life.

With her 2007 release, Wider, Melanie stretched out across both the globe and an expansive musical landscape. Both lush and focused, Wider portrays an artist and person with new confidence, at home in a big/small world. For all their power Tender Forever songs remain just that — tender. A song is a delicate thing and Melanie coaxes these fragile things into the larger world. Tender Forever is the biggest, softest sound you’ve heard. It’s a kick drum in an empty warehouse while little kids play right outside.

Tender Forever’s new album “Where Are We From” takes lost souls by the hand to create a chain of blinding light that leads to freedom and togetherness. Each song is impeccably different from the last and yet together, the collection is undeniably holistic and tightly interlaced. This is what you listen to on a road trip to your new self, louder than everything as the interstate ahead of you ribbons into dust and the blur of life is a distraction of sparkly lights. This is what makes your hands beat into your steering wheel and your head throw backwards to sing along. This is what you listen to when you need to shrug off an old armor in order to be reborn and washed clean while a steady hand gently pushes you in the direction of growth. Where Are We From is your new path, should you be brave enough to walk it?”

Taina Asili Y La Banda Rebelde

Puerto Rican vocalist Taína Asili carries on the tradition of her ancestors, fusing past and present struggles into one soulful and defiant voice. Her newest artistic work is with La Banda Rebelde (the Rebel Band), a six piece international ensemble based in Albany, NY. This dynamic force brings love, resistance, and ancestral remembrance to venues, festivals, conferences and political events across the globe. Powerful vocals laid over an energetic fusion of Afro-Latin, reggae, and rock sounds, the band’s eclectic style represents the diversity of its members, who have origins across the globe. Taína Asili’s voice exudes strength of Spirit, filling its listeners with the fervor of freedom and inspiring audiences to dance to the movement of rebellion.

Taína Asili y la Banda Rebelde released their debut album War Cry in 2010, which has already begun to gain international attention. With an uncompromising lyrical integrity and sound that spans continents, the multilingual album War Cry interblends the energy of Ojos de Brujo, the soul of Lila Downs and the defiance of Rage Against the Machine. Journalist Josh Potter of The Metroland, Albany, NY’s alternative newsweekly, describes War Cry as “a pan-global roots-musical mélange that appeals to the struggle of tradition to envision a world of social justice.”

Taína Asili hails from Philadelphia, PA and Albany, NY where she has worked as a musician, poet, educator and community organizer for over 10 years. She has shared the stage with renowned artists such as Ursula Rucker, Sonia Sanchez, Talib Kweli, Dead Prez, Immortal Technique, Pamela Means, Paula Cole, and Tyrone Hill of The Sun Ra Arkestra. Taína was a winner of the 2005 Transformation Award given by the Leeway Foundation each year to a select few of women artists who profoundly use their work towards social change. She was voted “Best Poet” in 2006 and “Best World Music” in 2010 by The Metroland.

“If you look at our history,” she says, “you see over and over that music has played a central role in changing how people think, for the good and bad. How we make change in the larger political landscape starts with how we affect one another individually, and music brings message in a way that opens people-their heart, mind, spirit. ”

Taína’s performance history and experience is as eclectic as her artistic work. Throughout her career, Taína has performed and recorded soulful back-up vocals for numerous bands including jam band Yolk, Puerto Rican punk band Ricanstruction, and hip hop/rock band Broadcast Live.

In her move to Philadelphia, Taína fell in love with spoken word and began writing and performing as a solo poet around the country. Her poetic work has been featured in a number of CD collections. She can also be witnessed in Scene and Not Heard, a documentary about women and hip hop culture in Philadelphia, also featuring Bahamadia and Monie Love.

Taína is dedicated to using her art as a tool for personal and social transformation. Her art is not only political, but based in the concrete organizing she is in involved in, working in political prisoner liberation, prisoner rights, indigenous rights, environmental justice, and holistic health movements for over a decade.”

Dalice Malice

Dalice Malice is a loud queer trans folk singer and multi-instrumentalist who kicks around Chicago, plays two types of ukulele and knows how to rock a mandolin and rainstick. She’s spent the past decade singing songs for strangers and friends, recording and releasing a heap of records and working toward her dream of one day opening for Ani DiFranco.

Virginia Cohen

Virginia Cohen began writing songs while studying abroad in Paris. She has written consistently ever since, to date penning over one hundred songs. Studio recordings include, Moving Into Indigo and 684 South June Street. Her next project is a collaboration with Portland musicians recording new material. Cohen draws inspiration from many sources including visual art, poetry, a love of history and the natural world. Among her strongest influences are Mary Oliver, Rilke, Rumi, Chagall, Rothko, and photographer Margaret Bourke-White. Her music comes from a desire to express truth and beauty in a chaotic and broken world.

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